VIATRIS provides patient access support through VIATRIS ADVOCATE®. A team of dedicated patient access specialists is available to answer patient queries and address concerns or questions regarding:

Benefits Advocate:

Your patients will have access to a trained Benefits Advocate—a go-to resource who can help patients navigate through the requirements of their insurance plan, whether it’s private or government sponsored.

Benefits Advocate can help by:

  • Coordinating insurance benefits
  • Helping fill out and file the right forms at the right time
  • Assisting in signing up for the Viatris Advocate Co-pay Program, if eligible
  • Helping to identify possible sources of financial assistance that patients may wish to contact

MS Resources Can Access Now

To find brochures, websites and more, on topics most relevant to your patients, visit our MS Resources page

call-iconCall Viatris Advocate today at 1.844.695.2667

download-iconDownload the Patient Enrollment Formpdf-icon

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

INDICATION

GLATIRAMER ACETATE INJECTION is indicated for the treatment of patients with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis, to include clinically isolated syndrome, relapsing-remitting disease, and active secondary progressive disease, in adults.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

GLATIRAMER ACETATE INJECTION is contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to glatiramer acetate or mannitol.

Approximately 16% of patients exposed to GLATIRAMER ACETATE INJECTION 20 mg per mL compared to 4% of those on placebo, and approximately 2% of patients exposed to GLATIRAMER ACETATE INJECTION 40 mg per mL compared to none on placebo experienced a constellation of symptoms that may occur within seconds to minutes after injection and included at least 2 of the following: flushing, chest pain, palpitations, tachycardia, anxiety, dyspnea, throat constriction, and urticaria. In general, these symptoms have their onset several months after the initiation of treatment, although they may occur earlier, and a given patient may experience 1 or several episodes of these symptoms. Typically, the symptoms were transient and self-limited and did not require treatment; however, there have been reports of patients with similar symptoms who received emergency medical care.

Transient chest pain was experienced by 13% of GLATIRAMER ACETATE INJECTION 20 mg per mL patients compared to 6% of placebo patients, and approximately 2% of GLATIRAMER ACETATE INJECTION 40 mg per mL patients compared to 1% on placebo.

While some episodes of chest pain occurred in the context of the immediate post-injection reactions that are described, many did not. The temporal relationship of this chest pain to an injection was not always known. The pain was usually transient, often unassociated with other symptoms, and appeared to have no clinical sequelae. Some patients experienced more than one such episode, and episodes usually began at least one month after the initiation of treatment.

At injection sites, localized lipoatrophy and, rarely, injection site skin necrosis may occur. Lipoatrophy may occur at various times after treatment onset (sometimes after several months) and is thought to be permanent. There is no known therapy for lipoatrophy.

Because GLATIRAMER ACETATE INJECTION can modify immune response, it may interfere with immune functions. For example, treatment with GLATIRAMER ACETATE INJECTION may interfere with recognition of foreign antigens in a way that would undermine the body’s tumor surveillance and its defenses against infection. There is no evidence that GLATIRAMER ACETATE INJECTION does this, but there has not been a systematic evaluation of this risk.

Cases of hepatic injury, some severe, including liver failure and hepatitis with jaundice, have been reported with GLATIRAMER ACETATE INJECTION. Hepatic injury has occurred from days to years after initiating treatment with GLATIRAMER ACETATE INJECTION. If signs or symptoms of liver dysfunction occur, consider discontinuation of GLATIRAMER ACETATE INJECTION.

The most common adverse reactions observed in controlled studies of GLATIRAMER ACETATE INJECTION 20 mg per mL and 40 mg per mL, were injection site reactions (ISRs), vasodilatation, rash, dyspnea and chest pain; ISRs were one of the most common adverse reactions leading to discontinuation of GLATIRAMER ACETATE INJECTION. ISRs, such as erythema, pain, pruritus, mass, edema, hypersensitivity, fibrosis, and atrophy, occurred at a higher rate with GLATIRAMER ACETATE INJECTION than placebo.

Please see full Prescribing Information for Glatiramer Acetate Injection 20 mg/mL or Glatiramer Acetate Injection 40 mg/mL.

In Home Injection

In-Home Injection Training

Viatris Advocate can assist your patients with an in-home training session with one of our experienced nurses, who can show your patients how to use the WhisperJECT® Autoinjector device or pre-filled glass syringe.

The WhisperJECT® Autoinjector is intended for use with FDA-approved products with non-viscous (aqueous) liquid formulations, which are presented in a 1.0 mL BD®, prefilled, glass syringe with staked needle, containing a fixed needle of 27G to 29G. The WhisperJECT® Autoinjector is a reusable injection device for the subcutaneous injection of certain FDA-approved drugs.

WhisperJECT® is available by prescription only.

Our MS-experienced nurses can also work with patients one-on-one to:

Connect your patients with, and encourage patient participation in the local and online MS community.

book-icon

Offer your patients tools to help track injections and questions for their nurse or doctor.

connected-network

Help your patients stay connected to a support network.

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Help your patients adjust their routine based on changes in weight, health or self-sufficiency.

In-home injection training

Your patients can call Viatris Advocate to schedule an in-home training session with one of our MS-experienced nurses, who can show your patient how to use the WhisperJECT® Autoinjector device or pre-filled glass syringe and guide them through each step of their injection. Please see the Instructions For Use provided with the WhisperJECT®.

experienced-nurses

Experienced Nurses Available

Viatris Advocate nurses are experienced in caring for people with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis. That's why they are available 24/7 to answer questions about:

  • Your patient's condition
  • Glatiramer Acetate Injection
  • Proper injection technique

Uncompromising support for patients with relapsing forms of MS

call icon

Call Viatris Advocate today 1.844.695.2667

Learn more about an FDA-Approved therapeutic equivalent to Copaxone® and patient access support

For commercially insured patients:

Your patients may be eligible to get their Glatiramer Acetate Injection prescription filled for a co-pay as low as $0.* Certain limits and restrictions apply. Call Viatris Advocate for more information on the Viatris Advocate Co-pay Program today 1.844.695.2667.

Co pay

Viatris Advocate Co-pay Program

With the Viatris Advocate Co-pay Program, out-of-pocket price for Glatiramer Acetate Injection could be as low as $0 a month.*

  • No financial qualifications
  • If your patient's insurance has recently changed, contact Viatris Advocate to see if your patient is eligible for the Viatris Advocate Co-Pay Program
*Certain limits and restrictions apply. Please see eligibility criteria and terms and conditions below.

Terms and Conditions for the Glatiramer Acetate Co-Pay Program

For terms and conditions click here.

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INDICATION

GLATIRAMER ACETATE INJECTION is indicated for the treatment of patients with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis, to include clinically isolated syndrome, relapsing-remitting disease, and active secondary progressive disease, in adults.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

GLATIRAMER ACETATE INJECTION is contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to glatiramer acetate or mannitol.

Approximately 16% of patients exposed to GLATIRAMER ACETATE INJECTION 20 mg per mL compared to 4% of those on placebo, and approximately 2% of patients exposed to GLATIRAMER ACETATE INJECTION 40 mg per mL compared to none on placebo experienced a constellation of symptoms that may occur within seconds to minutes after injection and included at least 2 of the following: flushing, chest pain, palpitations, tachycardia, anxiety, dyspnea, throat constriction, and urticaria. In general, these symptoms have their onset several months after the initiation of treatment, although they may occur earlier, and a given patient may experience 1 or several episodes of these symptoms. Typically, the symptoms were transient and self-limited and did not require treatment; however, there have been reports of patients with similar symptoms who received emergency medical care.

Transient chest pain was experienced by 13% of GLATIRAMER ACETATE INJECTION 20 mg per mL patients compared to 6% of placebo patients, and approximately 2% of GLATIRAMER ACETATE INJECTION 40 mg per mL patients compared to 1% on placebo.

While some episodes of chest pain occurred in the context of the immediate post-injection reactions that are described, many did not. The temporal relationship of this chest pain to an injection was not always known. The pain was usually transient, often unassociated with other symptoms, and appeared to have no clinical sequelae. Some patients experienced more than one such episode, and episodes usually began at least one month after the initiation of treatment.

At injection sites, localized lipoatrophy and, rarely, injection site skin necrosis may occur. Lipoatrophy may occur at various times after treatment onset (sometimes after several months) and is thought to be permanent. There is no known therapy for lipoatrophy.

Because GLATIRAMER ACETATE INJECTION can modify immune response, it may interfere with immune functions. For example, treatment with GLATIRAMER ACETATE INJECTION may interfere with recognition of foreign antigens in a way that would undermine the body’s tumor surveillance and its defenses against infection. There is no evidence that GLATIRAMER ACETATE INJECTION does this, but there has not been a systematic evaluation of this risk.

Cases of hepatic injury, some severe, including liver failure and hepatitis with jaundice, have been reported with GLATIRAMER ACETATE INJECTION. Hepatic injury has occurred from days to years after initiating treatment with GLATIRAMER ACETATE INJECTION. If signs or symptoms of liver dysfunction occur, consider discontinuation of GLATIRAMER ACETATE INJECTION.

The most common adverse reactions observed in controlled studies of GLATIRAMER ACETATE INJECTION 20 mg per mL and 40 mg per mL, were injection site reactions (ISRs), vasodilatation, rash, dyspnea and chest pain; ISRs were one of the most common adverse reactions leading to discontinuation of GLATIRAMER ACETATE INJECTION. ISRs, such as erythema, pain, pruritus, mass, edema, hypersensitivity, fibrosis, and atrophy, occurred at a higher rate with GLATIRAMER ACETATE INJECTION than placebo.